U.S. Supreme Court Affirms Time Spent Changing Clothes Not Compensable Work Time

On October 14, 2013, the Employment LawScene™ brought you an article explaining that the Supreme Court would hear oral arguments in Sandifer v. U.S. Steel Corp., a case out of the Seventh Circuit, to resolve disagreement among other circuit courts as to what constitutes “changing clothes” within the meaning of the Fair Labor Standards Act […]

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New Changes to Wisconsin's Unemployment Insurance Laws Take Effect January 5, 2014

The Wisconsin Legislature recently enacted major changes to Wisconsin’s unemployment insurance laws, a number of which will become effective on January 5, 2014. The most significant changes include an expansion of what conduct constitutes “misconduct” and establishes a new standard of “substantial fault,” which if proven, can temporarily disqualify an employee for unemployment insurance benefits. […]

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'Tis the Season: Tips for Avoiding Liability Related to Employer-Sponsored Holiday Parties

It is that time of the year again – the holidays are upon us! Along with the holidays comes holiday parties, which can bring your employees closer together and boost morale. While a fair amount of planning goes into venue, food, and festivities, employers should also plan ahead to avoid potential legal liability that can […]

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Tenth Circuit Says Employees Must Give Express Notice of Religion-Work Conflict

Earlier this month, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit found that the EEOC failed to establish a prima facie case of religious discrimination where the EEOC could not show that a prospective employee expressly informed the employer of a conflict between the applicant’s religious beliefs and the employer’s dress code and of […]

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